African Countries with the Most Venomous Women

By Onderi M. Dennis

The perception of women as a weaker sex and inferior to men has been around for ages, and this explains why retaliation, confrontation, and even argument are taboos for women as far as men are concerned. Sometimes these “taboos” can be necessary evils that a woman must engage in if personal self-defense, which is not only justified but also a right in international law, is anything to go by amid the rising cases of honour killing. Whereas domestic violence is generally outlawed in the Western World, the vice is inherently justified and condoned in some parts of Asia and most cultures in Third World countries. In Africa, for instance, there is a prevalence of domestic violence against women, but men are increasingly becoming victims of spousal assaults. Judging from the rampancy of domestic violence against men, here are the four countries that harbor the most venomous women in Africa:

NOTE: We use Anthony Abayomi Adebayo’s definition of domestic violence against men, which encompasses “physical aggression or assault (hitting, kicking, biting, shoving, restraining, slapping, throwing objects, battery), or threats thereof; sexual abuse; emotional abuse; controlling or domineering; intimidation; and economic abuse.”

#4. South Africa

Mashilo Mnisi, the chief executive of Moshate (a South African men’s rights organisation), once described men battering as “South Africa’s hidden crime.” Given women’s long history of abuse at the hands of men, the trend is gradually shifting and men are increasingly becoming victims. It is also worrying that the country has instituted biased legislation amid the societal stereotypes that stem from activism against gender-based violence. However, just like in other countries, male victims of domestic violence do not report their abusive spouses out of shame, but this does not reflect the true picture of the plight of men with regard to spousal abuse.

#3. Nigeria

There is a popular axiom in Nigeria that “men discovered fire, but women discovered how to play with it.” Nigerian men’s bloated egos are being bruised as more of their women show signs of growing social beards. Eziokwu! Perhaps the most popular case is that of Israel Obi, who was bathed in hot vegetable oil by his wife. Tufiakwa!

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In a 2009 study conducted by two scholars, Paul O. Dienye and Precious K. Gbeneol, men accounted for 10 percent of the 48 victims of domestic violence treated at the General Outpatient Department of the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital. The research, which was published in the American Journal of Men’s Health, revealed that a 36-year-old mechanical engineer, a 43-year-old commercial bank manager, a 42-year-old labourer, a 47-year-old farmer, and a 51-year-old trader were all treated for various injuries sustained from spousal abuse. In reality, such statistics represent just the tip of the iceberg; many cases of violence against men are under- or un-reported since saying that “I was beaten by my wife” is considered a misnomer in the country. Gbam!

#2. Ghana

Ghana is slowly becoming the epicenter of male battering. Statistics from the Domestic Violence and Victims Support Unit (DOVVSU) of the Ghana Police Service, 3,143 men reported various forms of abuse in 2013. Two years later (2015), 2 807 had reported the same ordeal. The Northern Region seems to be notorious after it accounted for 518 of all the cases. In fact, in 2009, 71 men from the region alone reported their abusive wives to the unit, 47 in 2010, 44 in 2011, 77 in 2012, 147 in 2013, and 132 in 2014. Due to religious and cultural resistance, the country is yet to enforce its penal code punishing domestic violence with prison sentences and fines.

#1. Kenya

Literally, this is the stomping ground of termagants in Africa. Simon Kiguta became the face of husband battery in Kenya when his photo appeared on the front page of the Daily Nation, one of the country’s major local dailies, but there has been a growing female superiority complex in the East African nation during the last one decade.

Simon Kiguta
Mr Simon Kiguta at the Nyeri Provincial General Hospital on February 10, 2012. Photo: NATION.

In 2011, over 460 000 men confessed that they had been battered by their wives in a survey conducted by Maendeleo Ya Wanaume (Mawe), a men’s rights group in the country. The group’s chair, Nderitu Njoka, recently reckoned that more than 2.8 million have been victims of domestic violence and that over 200 boys are sexually assaulted daily.

In 2011, over 460 000 men confessed that they had been battered by their wives in a survey conducted by Maendeleo Ya Wanaume (Mawe), a men’s rights group in the country. The group’s chair, Nderitu Njoka, recently reckoned that more than 2.8 million have been victims of domestic violence and that over 200 boys are sexually assaulted daily.

Cases of violence against men have been prevalent in the counties of Nyeri and Kakamega, but according to Mawe, the escalating phenomenon has spread to the counties of Nairobi, Kilifi, Kisii, Kisumu, Meru, Homa Bay, and Nakuru. Worse still, cases of violation of men’s property rights are on the rise, especially fake child upkeep expenses and redress, which recently entangled the country’s Deputy President, William Ruto. This trend was reflected in the group’s 2016 report, which revealed that 11 governors, 13 senators, 97 Members of Parliament, and 346 County Assembly Members had suffered physical, emotional, and economic abuse in the hands of their wives and mistresses.

Inasmuch as the list is not exhaustive, it is a warning for all the boys considering marrying from those countries. Lest I forget, even pointing a finger at a man by a woman is an abomination in my community. Hurry before word reaches the hyenas.

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